Athena Far East 3.0 Is Coming!

By CDR Michele Day

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Athena Far East 3.0 is this Friday!

Athena is coming back to Japan!

This Friday, April 21st, Sailors from all around Seventh Fleet are bringing their ideas  to the Submarine Sanctuary from 1400-1600.

Have you heard about the Athena Project and wonder what it is all about?
Do you have a BIG idea to make your command or the Navy better?

This event is the third Yokosuka Chapter event for The Athena Project, and whether you have an idea and need a stage or have passion and want to connect with like-minded innovators trying to make change, Athena Far East 3.0 is the place for you!

The Athena Project was created onboard USS BENFOLD in 2012  and now has 12 Active Chapters from Yokosuka to Mayport, and many concepts from our events have gone on to prototyping and development.  The goal of Athena is to make the Navy better by developing solutions to problems that Sailors see in the Fleet – anything from developing new systems or retooling old systems,  to new training plans, to fixing “broken” programs.  By harnessing deckplate innovations and creating a cadre of forward-thinking, creatively confident Sailors, we are paving the way for the Fleet of tomorrow.

Named after the Greek Goddess of Wisdom, Athena was a shrewd companion to heroes on epic endeavors. Which is why The Athena Project network works hard to help you push your great ideas forward. Because sometimes, that can be quite the epic endeavor.

We WANT you to join us – even if you just want to listen!

We WANT YOU TO PRESENT AN IDEA!  You can present as a team or by yourself.  The presentation materials and aids are also yours to decide – the  only rule is NO PowerPoint.

If you have an idea you want to present at ATHENA Far East, shoot us an e-mail athenanavy@gmail.com.

ATHENA belongs to YOU – COME MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

 

Athena DC 2.0 Is Coming!

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Are you going to Sea Air Space 2017 and looking for a way to connect with deckplate innovators across the Navy and Marine Corps? Are you in the DC area and want to check out what an Athena Project event is all about? Do you have a big idea that you want to pitch to connect with hard-charging folks who can make it happen?

If the answer to any of those questions is yes, then have we got a deal for you!

The Athena Project is hosting it’s second DC Chapter event during the Sea Air Space Expo at the Irish Whisper on Monday, April 3rd at 7PM!

Since early 2013, Athena pitch events have been a great way to connect to the Defense Innovation Network and hear (or pitch) some groundbreaking ideas to make things better! These events have come to be described as Shark Tank meets TED Talks and give grassroots innovators a voice by giving them the stage for five minutes to pitch their big ideas. After five minutes of Q&A from the audience and our esteemed panel, the crowd will vote on ideas based on Idea Quality, Actionability, and Presentation to crown the Admiral Sims Award for Intellectual Courage to the top concept.

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Presenters and Panelists from last year’s Athena DC 1.0 at Sea Air Space.

Last year’s winner was a game-changing sonar transducer cover, designed by our Sims Winner and 3D printable, that’s saving money and maintenance hours today. We’ll even get an update on its progress at the event!

The Athena Project has 12 Active Chapters from Yokosuka to Mayport, and many concepts from our events have gone on to prototyping and development. As an example, check out this concept that emerged from the Athena West Chapter that went on to win last year’s Innovation Jam on its way to improve surface ships’ gunnery!

There’s still time to slide into a presentation slot for Monday’s event if you’ve got a big idea that you want to see happen! Just send us a note at athenanavy@gmail.com if you want to present!

If you just want to come hear the pitches and network with like-minded catalysts, that’s cool too! Just swing by the Irish Whisper and join us! Registration always helps (you can do that here) or just come as you are and be part of the movement.

Let’s go fast.

 

2048… The Magic Number

By LCDR Kristen Wheeler

2048

Being a mobile gaming app addict, I came across one particular addictive game a couple months ago. “2048”, published by Ketchapp in app stores in 2014, is ridiculously easy to grasp while still providing a difficult challenge. The rules are simple… move the blocks horizontally or vertically to combine adjacent, like numbers until you reach 2048. For example, a block with the number “2” can only be combined with another block with the number “2” that is beside, above, or below it. When you combine two “2” blocks… you make a “4” block. Then you can push two “4” blocks together to make an “8” block, and then two “8” blocks together to make a “16” block… and so on and so forth… until you finally have created an opportunity to push two “1024” blocks together for the win. It’s not as easy as you think.

So take a second a download it. It’s free. The rest of the article might make a little more sense after you’ve played the game. If you become addicted, it’s not my fault.

After playing an embarrassing number of hours on this game (mostly never at work), it occurred to me that this game illustrates a fantastic strategy when it comes to scale and collaboration with respect to the multitude of emergent innovation efforts happening throughout the Navy and Marine Corps.

Over the last year I’ve been keeping a list of all the different innovation related ideas, projects, efforts, cells, and groups (of various maturity, sizes, scope, focus, audience, legitimacy, credibility, support, and funding) that have sprouted up throughout the Department of the Navy (and beyond). We have Secretary of the Navy’s Strategy and Innovation Department, Task Force Innovation (TFI), Naval Innovation Advisory Council (NIAC), The Hatch, CNO’s Rapid Innovation Cell (CRIC), The Athena Project, Defense Entrepreneurs Forum (DEF), DEFx, Tactical Advancement for Next Generation (TANG), Junior Enlisted Innovation Think Tank (JITT), Naval Innovation Network (NIN), MD5, MilSuite, Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUx), High Velocity Learning (HVL), TOOLKit, Cognitive Warrior Continuum, Illuminate, MMOWGLI, Junior Officer Symposium, Hacking 4 Defense, Hack the Sky, Hack the Machine, Innovation Certificate at NPS, USMC Wearable Challenge, PEO-EIS Innovation Cell, FabLabs, RoboDojo, Future Strategy Forum, Naval STEM, RDT&E Strategic Cell, and so much more.

In addition, there are a wide array of official and unofficial places that are publishing various innovation efforts which include (but certainly not limited to); SECNAV’s Strategy & Innovation, Athena Project, DEF, Atlantic Council, Naval Institute (website and Proceedings), Naval Science and Technology Future Force Magazine, War on the Rocks, Connecting the Dots, Military Writers Guild, CIMSEC, The Navalist, Defense One, and good ole Navy Times… just to name a few.

So what does this all of this have to do with “2048”? Over the last 14 months of watching super smart Sailors and DoN Civilians roll up their sleeves to implement their great idea, there is almost always that moment of defeat. The innovator stands at the edge of the cliff, overlooking a massive chasm, and wondering how on Earth they will ever be able to cross it and scale their idea into their biggest vision. “2048” could offer a solution to the ever growing multitude of emergent innovation efforts… we need to start combining.

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“If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.” – Henry Ford

What if groups that harvested Sailor’s ideas (2) were combined with research and development units (2) in an effort to build a true partnership (2+2) where Sailors ideas were systematically researched and funded each and every quarter (4)? Then what if one of the new innovation culture-based workshops (2) mated with an organizational metrics and collection team (2), thereby solidifying (2+2) as a quantifiable and adaptable learning program (4)? And then what if this new adaptable learning program (4), which exposed more Sailors to creative, cognitive, systems thinking mechanisms combined systematically researched Sailor’s ideas (4) to reinforce (4 +4) an inclusive systems approach to learning through real impact (8). There are a million other variables that we can continue to merge together.   The point is that when we combine our efforts, we become stronger. Dollars to ideas to education to collaboration opportunities to networks to organizational culture… what if we ask ourselves, how can I collaborate in such a way that both parties end up twice as strong in the end? And lest we forget the power of the media! By the time we are breaking barriers, we must share what we are doing so that others may gain insight and inspiration! A fusion of entertaining media (1024) and amazing advances brought about by radical collaboration (1024), only leads us to the ever coveted 2048.

Reflecting back on my time as a NIAC Fellow in FY16, one of the most valuable lessons I learned is that power and accomplishment comes from sustainable partnerships. No one can get their idea off the ground alone. It literally takes a village, or in our case, a Fleet. The only way we can scale and grow and instill the systemic culture changing behaviors (agility and adaptability being at the top of that list) in order to take ideas into meaningful realities is to combine efforts… and then perhaps 4096 will then be the new magic number.

 

Kristen Wheeler is the Executive Officer of the Navy Operational Support Center, San Jose. Before she was a NIAC Fellow, she founded The Athena Project’s Southeast chapter.

Athena Northwest 4.0 Preview

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The Athena Project NW will be holding their semi-annual pitch competition event at the LCPO Mess on base at Naval Base Kitsap on the 20th of January open to all (all active duty, DOD employees and retirees alike).

The Athena Project is an all-volunteer, grassroots organization seeking to foster and promote innovation within the Navy and DoD for the benefit of our sailors, dependents and nation as a whole. No idea is too big or small!

The event will be comprised of a guest speakers and focus on a pitch competition (in the format similar to ‘Shark Tank’ meets ‘TED Talk’ venue) where the ideas will be voiced and a winner will be selected base on feasibility, quality, novelty and actionability.

Come join us for a fun, energizing and exciting event where your ideas can be heard!

The pitch competition is open to the entire region. If you have an innovative idea you would like to present, please contact LT Daniel Conley at navyathenanw@gmail.com to submit your idea. Please submit pitches by the 13th of January to ensure inclusion. Free drinks will be provided for pitch presenters!

Location: Chief’s Mess (Below Sam Adams) at Naval Base Kitsap, Bremerton, WA

Time: 1330-1500

Attire: Business casual

Register to Attend:  http://athenanws.eventbrite.com

Admission is free and open to anyone and everyone!

POC:     LT Daniel Conley

512-981-7399

Athena Monterey 1.0 Roundup

By LCDR Kristen Wheeler

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Monterey, California -truly a mecca for Naval Innovation – held its first Athena Project Pitch Event back in August at the London Bridge Pub. In a room with a view overlooking historic Monterey bay, six presenters from both Naval Postgraduate School and Defense Language Institute took the stage and brought their big ideas out into the light of day. Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, and academics from a myriad of backgrounds filled the room not only with their presence, but also their enthusiasm and curiosity.

CDR Andy Newsome, who brilliantly brought two massive commands together and then organized Athena Monterey 1.0, emceed the event. Volunteers from the audience pulled names out of the cup for the order of the presenters… and then were subsequently awarded an Athena Monterey 1.0 custom-designed coin which was 3D-printed at NPS’s Maker Space, Robo Dojo. The presenters then each had 5 minutes to present their idea and then another 5 minutes to answer audience questions.

The evening proved to be electric as compelling insights unfolded one right after another both from the presenters and those who came to support. Here is a quick encapsulation of the concepts presented.

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LT Todd Coursey (NPS) – Maker Box

Navy LT Todd Coursey, a heavyweight in the Navy’s additive manufacturing and Maker Space movement , started the evening off by capturing our attention by bringing in a box about twice the size of a large shoe box. His concept aimed at enabling senior officer and enlisted leadership exposure to advanced digital manufacturing and coding capabilities.   Todd said that this generation is growing up in an environment where digital capabilities have become democratized to the point where seven year olds in third world nations can be taught to create micro-controllers.  Curiosity piqued, he explained to the wide-eyed audience that this box is actually a portable additive manufacturing tool that has the potential to disrupt coding and digital manufacturing education easily and widely, opening up military and civilians to endless possibilities when coupled with a cohesive, creative, and cost-effective curriculum. By giving leaders a three to five day dose of the realm of the possible when it comes to current technology and how easy it is to employ.

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Maj. Nick AionaAka (NPS) – Leadership Reimagined

Nick AionaAka delivered Athena’s first Marine Corps pitch, bringing to the crowd a very relevant and timely idea that will flip collaboration and leadership shortfalls head over heels and into the future with wings. A big believer in organization culture as the root of all innovative commands, Nick offers that giving units or unrelated groups of DoD personnel take a tactical pause and step out of the forest so they can see the trees, could prove just the ticket to help us experience and discuss key pillars such as trust, communication, collaboration, connectedness, and other cultural nuances that are necessary for next generation ingenuity to thrive. But Nick also states that stepping out of the forest proverbially can happen by stepping in an actual forest. Getting back into nature and around a campfire are the best ways to remind ourselves that authentically connecting and learning from one another has a great deal of meaning when we are doing in our most simplest environments.

Peter Ateshian (NPS) – Femto Satellite Communications

NPS Professor Peter Ateshian left the audience in awe when he explained how Femto-Satellites could rewrite the books on how we communicate. With his son by his side, Peter brought a prototype of an actual size satellite… which was ridiculously small by the way… and passed it around the audience so we could truly understand just how disruptive and enhancing this technology could be. Not only can these miniature satellite carry a signal which provide timing and position, they work in our atmosphere, in space… and can float in the ocean. Lasting 6-8 weeks, the mini-sats cost a meager $30 a pop and the capabilities that can be provided are absolutely endless.

Cpt Sarah Martin (DLI) – Aptitude Targeting

Over from Defense Language School, Army CPT Sarah Martin followed up next and presented a solution set that could increase effective recruiting of amazing foreign language instructors – The “Unicorns.” Finding exceptional language instructors at DLI is no easy task… hunting needles in haystacks, especially for obscure languages. Sarah believes we can not only find a wider selection of instructor candidates to teach our Sailors, Soldiers, Airman and Marines, but they can be found with lesser manpower… simply by harnessing the power of social media. Using sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter… even Snapchat and Instagram can be used to reach specific audiences… namely language instructors in this case. By capitalizing on public demographic information that users provide to social media sites, DLI can include this into their marketing and recruiting strategies. Targeting ads through Facebook, for example, can cost very little… as much as $0.24 a click… sometimes event less. And without being invasive, it allows people who possess the skillsets needed to teach a language to find out about employment opportunities at DLI they might not have otherwise known about. Sarah’s idea wowed the audience as she was peppered with questions and idea riffs following her presentation.

CPO John-Mark Allen (DLI) – Realizing the Paperless Navy

Chief John-Mark Allen stirred the crowd by asking anew the question every person in the Department of Defense has pondered at some point… What ever happened to the notion of a paperless Navy? His question was has been asked for over 18 years now since it was first proposed in 1998. And though there are some places where we have gone paperless, for example using NSIPS to route leave documents, we still have no shortage of blue and red folders plaguing commands. Breaking the old paradigm requires a culture shift, and Chief Allen proposes posing an internal “tax” on paper and toner. By increasing the price of paper and toner, commands will be pushed to adopt to myriad of other solutions for electronically routing documents.

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LT Jesse Iwuji (NPS)– NASCAR Recruiting
**Admiral Sims Award for Intellectual Courage**

Our last presenter, LT Jesse Iwuji, immediately captured the audiences undivided attention by taking the stage in his NASCAR racing gear. As it turns out, we have within our Navy ranks a bonafide NASCAR driver… and one of two African American drivers in the circuits. When he’s not the Director of Student Services at NPS, Jesse hits the track. Jesse proposed using his influence within the NASCAR racing fan base to promote and recruit for the Navy. Because he is the only active duty driver and a minority on the circuit, Jesse attracts the camera nearly every single race. He garners an average of $1.5 million dollars worth of airtime, which is actively promotes the Navy because he’s a proud Surface Warfare Officer. However, there is more potential. The Navy could easily capture an even bigger ROI by being the only service in history to sponsor a car driven not only by their own service member, but an active duty one at that. It’s a no brainer… which is why Jesse won the Admiral Sims Award for Intellectual Courage.

Plans for Athena Monterey 2.0 and updates on our presenters coming soon… so stay tuned!

Athena East 3.0 Roundup

The Athena Project returned to the Norfolk area for the third installment, accompanied by terrific weather and a great audience for an out outdoor event. The event was held at the River Stone Chophouse in Suffolk, VA on October 19 at 1800

The presenters pitched ideas to an audience charged with excitement and an illustrious panel including CAPT Heritage, CAPT Kiss, and ONR Science Advisor Mr. Blakely. All 7 of the projects struck a chord with those in attendance, stirring conversations on how to improve things.

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The Audience Assembles on an Evening Perfect for an Outdoor Setting.

CPO Rory Satnik – Hydrophobic Coating on Sonar Arrays
**Admiral Sims Award for Intellectual Courage**


CPO Satnik proposed coating Sonar Arrays for increased performance. He proposed coating current Navy towed SONAR arrays with a superhydrophobic coating and thereby reducing the drag coefficient of the array and gaining what is referred to in SONAR as crucial decibels (dB) in an effort to increase our opportunity for detecting contacts of interest.

He also proposed coordinating a ships entry into a dry dock maintenance period as an opportunity to coat the hull mounted SONAR array with the same hydrophobic coating.  Terrific idea!

Admiral Sims Winner

Rory drives the point home.

PO2 Brenden Hebert NCDOC – Cross Organization Red Teaming for Navy


Recent Cyber related incidents have taken place on legacy or extraneous networks where our ability to oversee or act is limited due to the lack coverage and understanding. An example of this would be the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) breach of 2015 or a site such as the MWR, which may lay outside of our visibility spectrum. PO2 Hebert proposed the organization of a team or teams who have the responsibility of mapping, documenting, and hardening these potential vulnerabilities. The Navy currently implements some of these items through “Red Teams”, however the scope of these teams is primarily focused on our primary assets such as commands or ships. His proposal included a much more thorough understanding of these spaces to increase coverage and visibility. According to PO2, as it stands we have a incomplete view of the battle space that is the cyber world; more importantly the lack of information is represented in our own interests and assets. Without having proper knowledge of our own systems, cyber defense is much harder, enemies might exploit backdoors that we don’t have visibility on. This poses a potential risk to the DoD at large as seen again with the OPM breach last year.

LTJG Kindervater USS RHODE ISLAND – Shipyard Casualty Response Tracking (SCRT)


LTJG Kindervater discussed a prototype of a device he built to provide Rapid personnel identification via RFID. The system featured plug-in power with battery backup to ensure system continuity, real-Time tracking to facilitate relief preparation, flexibility to assign placeholder names for personnel external to the command, and data logging to allow post-casualty event reconstruction.
This tool was developed due to the large number of potential responders to shipboard casualties. He believes a system that rapidly and accurately tracks ship’s force personnel responding to emergencies onboard the ship is required. Difficulties lie in distinguishing personnel in full-body firefighting ensembles and tracking stay times of firefighting teams in-hull. Based on his personal experience, existing methods require coordination between the staging area and supervisory location, which places unnecessary strain on DC Central supervisors. His concept rapidly identifies personnel, tracks firefighting team assignments and stay times, and provides the flexibility to augment ship’s force with personnel from neighboring vessels and firefighting units. By providing an up-to-date picture of deployed manpower, it eases strain on the supervisory element of casualty response, enabling more critical assessment of other casualty data.

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The Shark Panel Listening Intently

PO3 Brady Jordan FRCMA Washington – Clean Laser Preservation System

PO3 Jordon explained his innovative idea to replace the fleets abrasive blasting methods with a clean laser system. He explained the reduction of cost, man hours, and hazardous waste that would result in its use. He provided figures to convince the audience that this was something the Navy should attempt. The following link is what PO3 Jordan has in mind: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSP1vH7-t7s

PO2 Teal USS RHODE ISLAND – Navy Exam Hub

Petty Officer Teal presented a Exam Hub database that he was working on. The Exam Hub program includes all relevant data for exams, their questions, and all personnel that have taken an exam or answered a question. The database contains five main data tables with a separate data table for every question and person for its history. Exams for any rate or watch station can be generated by topic, watchstation, rate, and difficulty level at the click of a button. It included personnel question history to provide training recommendations and show weak areas. It had an easy method to input questions into database that will be stored indefinitely in a secure database. It also featured easy integration with graphical libraries to provide visual feedback to include trend graphs, distributions, and any other visual feedback that is desired. This idea was deemed relevant and useful because of training administrative difficulties that arise on every ship specifically based on exam approval time.

LT Peoples USS RHODE ISLAND (Enhanced Force Protection Training in Shipyards

*Admiral Sims Award for Intellectual Courage 1st Runner Up*


LT Peoples demonstrated the creative method he has developed to train his Sailors without access to resources available to him in the past. He explained ideas that he would like to employ, but needed some help from the enterprise to fully realize. Specifically, ships in naval shipyards are in a position where they cannot easily exercise their skills on their own ship. To provide for a more realistic approach that doesn’t require the Sailor to attend external schooling he proposed using decommissioned ships in the shipyard as a training ground for security forces. The training would involve airsoft style training weapons to put Sailors in simulated situations where they are able to demonstrate and reinforce previous training. He would have the armed watchstanders to respond to a threat in a simulated live fire environment where if they fail to use good judgment/tactics they will receive immediate tactile feedback. His training would use existing areas and only require an initial investment for purchase of the weapons and supporting material, as well as a small maintenance fee to keep up consumable stock. This training could be controlled by the command and be worked into existing schedules as to maximize shipboard participation and enhance the security forces.

LTJG McGough NNWC – Software as a Service for Naval Networks


LTJG McGough presented a proposal for the creation of a Navy Digital Service – a Navy component to the Defense Digital Service that will develop and maintain software-as-a-service to meet the Navy’s unique requirements. He wanted to change the Navy’s model of a one time purchase of software to a continuous development cycle more in line with the commercial software industry. LTJG McGough’s proposal was very insightful and forward thinking.

Event Host

A Huge Thanks to Adam for Putting Together Such a Great Event!


All-in-all a great group of presenters showed up and delivered their pitches to an enthusiastic audience. The night was an amazing opportunity to facilitate discussion and encourage out of the box thinking. Based on the audience and the presenter’s conversations I wouldn’t be surprised to see all of these ideas implemented in some form in the near future.

Find us on Facebook or Twitter (@athenanavy) or e-mail us at athenanavy@gmail.com!

Athena East 3.0: One Week Away!

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Greetings, Athenians! We hope you’re as excited as we are for the upcoming Athena East 3.0 pitch event that’s a week from today!

The event will be at the River Stone Chophouse in Suffolk, VA on October 19th at 1800. You can register to attend right here.

Our Athena pitch events provide a venue for Sailors and DoD employees to present their big ideas to make their organization or the Navy better. Selected presenters will have five minutes to present their idea and then five additional minutes to field questions from the crowd and the assembled panel of leaders. At the end of all pitches, the crowd will vote on the concepts based on impact, actionability and presentation to award the top concept the Admiral Sims Award for Intellectual Courage.

The Purpose of Athena East 3.0 is to connect Sailors with ideas to an audience of professionals from the military, academia, industry, and the community who are supportive of military problem solving and problem ownership.  We want to develop a cadre of forward-thinking, creatively confident Sailors for the Fleet of tomorrow and build a diverse, supportive network to help them move forward.  Build a sense of problem ownership, where a Sailor sees a problem and develops a solution, and presents to leadership to get specific support. Athena East 3.0 is an informal gathering to hear, support, and celebrate Service-members and/or DoD civilians acting on their passion to improve their unit or service.For more on how Athena works and some of our past events, check out our roundup articles while you’re here on the blog!

There’s still time if you’re interested in presenting! The window to submit concepts is open, and if you’re interested, e-mail our Athena East Chapter lead at vakahnke@gmail.com with a brief summary your idea. The selection of the 5-6 presenters will be made on Sunday!

As an added bonus for this Athena event, registered attendees will have special access to the Submarine Information Exchange Tactical Advancements for the Next Generation (TANG) technology expo at the Lockheed Martin Lighthouse  prior to the event. Come by and check out the fantastic technology companies that are inspiring the TANG workshop participants before heading over to the Chophouse!

We’re looking forward to seeing you there!

 

 

 

 

 

Athena Southeast 2.0 Roundup

By: LT Lindsey Beates and LCDR Tim Bierbach

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The Athena Project returned to the Southeast region with quite a lot of energy! NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NS King’s Bay all rallied to support local grassroots innovation within the Navy and their communities at large. Athena Southeast 2.0 quickly hit targeted presentations of five, within two days after placing a call out for innovative projects. In all, five presenters and four other projects were accepted for this event. The event was held on August 5, at Veterans United Brewery, a veteran-owned company in the Southside of Jacksonville.

Presenters captivated the crowd with their creative concepts and ideas, making their pitches to fellow Sailors, industry, and academia, as well as a panel of leaders in the Southeast region. The panelists were CAPT Anthony Corapi, Commodore of Patrol & Reconnaissance Wing 11, CDR James Harney, CO of Afloat Training Group Mayport, LCDR Mike Zdunkeiwiz, Training Officer for the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School (MPRWS) and Chief Collins, LCPO at the MPRWS Mobile Tactical Operations Center.

Each of the projects challenged existing paradigms in a progressive fashion, and the panelists did an exceptional job directing their questions toward challenging the weak portions of the projects while bolstering their strengths. Every question provided insight from experience and helped the presenters continue to mature their pitch and project.

In no particular order, our presenters were:

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PO2 Kuhns, presenting Media Management Database

(Admiral Sims Award for Intellectual Courage – Athena Southeast 2.0)

The Media Management Database is designed to increase efficiency and quality control of the media sets required for the P-8A aircraft and media issues are currently plaguing the community, causing late departures, excessive preflight, and canceled events.   The relationship between the squadrons and the Mobile Tactical Operations Centers (MTOCs) continued to be stressed while senior leadership develops a viable solution. Furthermore, combat aircrews began flying with limited standard media loads that reduce the US Navy’s overall combat capability.

PO2 Kuhns worked with VP-16 to develop a database centered on supply management and lean six sigma principals, and programed using Microsoft Access. The concept simply tracks the each piece of media, associated burning step, and location from start to storage in a near real time application. Everyone with the rights to the database now had the ability to track the applicable stages and location of the media.

This database was employed by MTOC One and VP16 as a pilot project during their inter-deployment readiness cycle and last deployment. The success was recognized immediately and media related issues were reduced, enabling MTOC One to create a more agile and adaptive process meeting the needs of the fleet. The database has the potential to be developed concurrently with SPAWAR and implemented throughout Wing 11 to increase the quality control of Media and effectiveness of the fleet. PO2 Kuhns, is stationed at Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) One at NAS Jacksonville.

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PO1 Laramie Foster, presenting Test Item Analysis

Test Item Analysis is program that has taken one of the Navy’s most vital challenges – its ability to conduct self-assessments. Training, one of the Navy’s core missions, is continuously improving the measures of performance (MOP) and measures of effectiveness (MOE) that build our warfighters. The current problem for the majority of the Navy is that we are still developing and testing based on a perceptual concept and not a systematic process. Test Item Analysis empowers the average sailor and improves our for Navy Instructional system design environments.

PO1 Foster’s program uses a visual basic to generate pre-populated templates to reduce the manual effort and increase the ease of use.  The Trident Training Center uses a beta version of the program and continues to undergo a continuous improvement cycle to deliver the training desire. Using a static version during several formal courses yielded extensive improvement on time required for testing the desired outcomes and reduced to time required to achieve the desired action. This program is not just for short-term analytics but it can develop long-term history base on outcomes and desired end states.

The test item analysis is looking to begin collaboration with other unit to expand its base and sample size. Several Commands at Athena expressed interest in building pilot programs to assess the potential outcomes. PO1 Foster designed the program to be maintained at a local level and is excited to collaborate with the Fleet in the near future. PO1 Foster is stationed at the Trident Training Facility NSB Kings Bay.

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LT Braz Kennedy, presenting iLOC

iLOC is a project that focuses on increasing the accuracy and timeliness of tactic, techniques and procedures (TTP) during the anti-submarine warfare (ASW). For decades, TTPs have accepted numerous errors based on the human limitation and the variables calculated. With the introduction of the P-8A and its combat system, we now have the ability to conduct rapid calculation based on amplified information to increase our warfighting effectiveness.

The Project looks to conduct incremental changes. The First stage would be achieved by developing a basic excel style application that would codify the current math and science portions of our TTPs. This spread sheet would utilize the computer as a calculator for the basic equations and while enabling the crew to alter the variables to keep pace with current tactical situation. The 2nd Stage would be to imbed this capability into the P-8A combat systems, similar to Boeing’s Flight management computer.

Currently the spreadsheet continues to be developed and reviewed by multiple Maritime Weapons and Tactics Instructors. The application has also been forwarded to the Center for Naval Analysis to begin validation. This project is a progression for Cold War system that was designed to be implemented into the P-7 program before it was canceled. LT Kennedy is stationed at VP-30 in NAS Jacksonville.

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LT Doug Kettler, presenting High Velocity Learning within Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force

High Velocity Learning (HVL) within Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) looked at how to begin implementation of the CNO’s vision of HVL at every level. The project defined and dismantled the Toyota Production System (TPS) to build an initial framework to deviate.  It also drew a correlation between the history of the scientific method and the application in today’s innovative culture. This Framework is vital to cultivating an agile and adaptive process throughout the MPRF at large.

Doug’s project illustrated the progression from the Aviation Tactics and Techniques Innovation Cell (ATTIC) he helped stand up at VP-16. During his tour, he designed, developed, implemented and wrote on several innovative projects that applied HVL successfully. One of his examples was a project to reduce the P-8 preflight for ASW events from 3 hours to 1.5 hours. The command targeted several key performance indicators that related to delays, analyzed the information, and put controls in place. The Project was able swarm the problem and use ideology from TPS to develop the solutions. Within one day and the 6 flights dedicated to this portion of the project they were able to achieve their goal of reducing preflight time by 50 percent and saving in excess of 135 man-hours across the 6 project events. This data was then captured and published to complete the HVL process.

Doug continues mature his framework for HVL within MPRF. Many of his projects that he worked on during his tour at V16’s ATTIC have now been published as tactics, techniques, and procedures that have been adopted throughout the fleet. LT Kettler is stationed at the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School (MPRWS) in NAS Jacksonville.

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LT Josh Mitchell, presenting EMW4ASW

EMW 4 ASW (Electronic Maneuver Warfare for Anti-Submarine Warfare) was a CNO Rapid Innovation Cell (CRIC) accepted project before the group was defunded. This project targets a latent vulnerability from the Cold War ASW strategy. Sonobuoys use legacy technology that operates on one of 99 channels with in a small frequency range. This constraint also limits the data rate and amount of data transferred. Sonobuoys still possess enormous potential and the fix is not difficult. Incorporating photonic into the current sonobuoys increases their combat potential in the 21st Century sensor.

LT Mitchell project looks to open the aperture by building an agile system and incorporating photonic into current sonobuoys.   For minimal cost, photonic will expand sonobuoys frequency spectrum exponentially and enable them to become frequency agile. Spectrum management would now be constrained via software updated and not hardware changes. Many secondary benefits would materialize from this upgrade. Data rates, bandwidth, and encryption are just a few of the potential areas for improvement. LT Mitchell, the MPRWS, and Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) have been collaborating on this project for over two years to turn EMW 4 ASW into a reality, which would be a game changer for ASW.

The project continues to look for a champion and funding to build an initial prototype. PMA-264, ASW projects, has now taken an interest in the idea but due to funding cuts the project is still in idle. GTRI estimated that the project would take less than nine months for an initial test of the concept and could support the development in the near future. LT Mitchel is stationed at the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School in NAS Jacksonville.

Overall, it was a very successful evening. All of the presenters gave practical, innovative solutions to current issues facing our Navy – either at the work center, squadron, or fleet level – and the audience members learned a lot. We are looking forward to Athena South East 3.0, to be held sometime this winter!

How an E-5 Dental Tech is Supporting the Navy’s Energy Security

By HM2 Joshua Cranford

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Beginning fiscal year 2017 the United States Naval Academy (USNA) will be starting research into partially premixed diesel fuel as a measure to ensure the Navy’s energy security. They’ll do this with funding from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) as a direct result of a pitch that I made. Did I mention I’m a Second Class Petty Officer; who serves as a Dental Technician?

Empathizing with the reader taking this information in let me answer the obvious question- Yes, reality is stranger than fiction. Had I worked for a company like Google or Facebook and suggested an app for the company to produce, it would be very easy to digest one of these titans of innovations running with an idea from any source; but the Navy? One of the largest bureaucracies in the world listening to a… Dental Tech… on macroeconomic energy trends? The Navy has something Google and Facebook don’t though, and that’s ATHENA. And well, you know, a slightly over-zealous Dental Tech. Having said all that just know this isn’t a politically correct puff piece; just for the record- the Navy doesn’t pay E-5’s enough to write those.

A NAVADMIN was released in December of 2015 calling for sailors with a “High Risk, High Reward” idea to submit an application to the CNO’s Rapid Innovation Cell (CRIC). I read about this and submitted 18 pages of “this is so obscure, it might work” and associated documents on how to integrate hydrogen use into the fleet as a viable substitute for fossil fuels. Long story short my proposal on how to allocate $1.3 million for a proof of concept for Project Water Engine (PWE) fell by the way of congress defunding the CRIC- I wrote angry letters to both of my senators and my congressmen; but I digress.

A few weeks later I got an email from the CRIC coordinator informing me about ATHENA DC 1.0 taking place at the Sea Air and Space Symposium in just over a month. I sent off my white paper on PWE to ATHENA with all the enthusiasm an individual typical has when purchasing lottery tickets. Yeah I was ready for a win, but I wasn’t expecting my number to come up… I won the preverbal lottery.

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The panelists and presenters at Athena DC 1.0, hosted at the 2016 Sea Air Space Expo.

Immediately after ATHENA informed me I would be pitching, I got an email from the good people at ONR asking if I needed help refining my five-minute pitch. Well I looked up who I would be pitching to (a three-star admiral, and three other individuals with a collective IQ around 550ish), had a momentary panic attack, and then humbly accepted the offer for help. The three individuals I meet with at ONR took the weighty tomb of my novel idea and made it sound intelligible enough for a meaningful five-minute pitch.

Sea Air and Space came and if memory serves correctly, I was the fifth best pitch of five presenters. Measuring success is tricky business though. The conversation on PWE continued long after my five-minute public forum was concluded. The conversation also led me to being connected with the Naval Innovation Network; a group of driven individuals who don’t need to be told “it’s their Navy”; they already know.

After the pitch I guess is when you could say the real work started. I received an email from ONR again. While confidence in a project that called for gasoline-hydrogen-hybrids was thin, I was informed that there could be a funding possibility. ONR had money to spend but it needed to come from the Naval Enterprise Partnership Teaming with Universities for National Excellence (NEPTUNE) initiative; AKA alternatives energy research that goes through a college capstone/ research project. I had some work to do to align interests on PWE. I took to the Naval Innovation Network and tracked down some individuals at the Naval Academy. After some real champions of innovations pointed me in the right direction I found the Mechanical Engineering Department.

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The panelists and presenters at Athena DC 1.0, hosted at the 2016 Sea Air Space Expo.

From the start I wanted to prove that Hydrogen could be used as a cheap/ sustainable supplemental/ primary fuel in internal combustion engines; specifically, with gasoline. Fast forward a few months and a professor in the MECH ENG DEPT asks me the question “why not diesel, it’s the Navy’s favorite fuel source”. There’s more though- there was a concept floating around academia about pre-mixing hydrogen with diesel fuel. I looked at PWE and this concept of partially premixed diesel fuel fit like a glove.

So I had a few building blocks to work with: my idea, a college wanting to explore a new concept very similar to my idea, and funding for a college to explore my idea. Well ONR was very receptive to partially premixed diesel fuel and the Academy was very receptive to the idea of getting funding for a research project.

So if you’re considering submitting your idea to ATHENA for the opportunity to pitch remember three things:

  1. Never accept a “no” from someone who’s not authorized to say yes.
  2. A dental tech is influencing alternative energy research in the Navy.
  3. This one is from MCPON (ret) Stevens and couldn’t apply more- Build on small successes, and stay positive!
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Supporting the innovator to support the innovation.

HOWEVER, I hope it’s been noted that ATHENA never directly supported my “Innovation”. ATHENA supported me- the innovator. It was on me to align interests and exploit the Naval Innovation Network that I was connected with to promote my innovation. ATHENA provided me an opportunity to present my idea. More than that- ATHENA gave me the opportunity to create opportunity.

-Go Navy, Beat EVERYONE!

 

“Joshua Cranford is currently assigned to Naval Health Clinic Annapolis as a the Dental department ALPO and is currently pursuing a degree in mathematics.”

Athena West Waterfront 10 Roundup

By: LCDR Mark Blaszczyk

Welcome to the long awaited wrap-up for Athena West’s Waterfront 10.  At the end of June we hosted another outstanding event, Waterfront 10 at 32 North Brewing Company.  We listened to five great ideas in a very cozy atmosphere thanks to the outstanding questions and solid discussions of each idea by the audience.  Thank you to everyone who had the courage to present and came out to the event.  I’m always impressed by the ideas presented at our events and Waterfront 10 was no different.  Look for our next event in San Diego later this year.

Without further ado, the winner of the ADM Simms Award for Innovation for Waterfront Athena 10 and gift certificate from MakerPlace:

“Correlated Magnets” by LT Isaac Wang

Stumbling on these magnets while working on a separate product, LT Wang immediately saw the potential uses for the Navy.  Conventional magnets create a magnetic field with a North & South pole on opposing ends creating the attractive and repelling forces most people are familiar with. Scientists have figured out how to use software magnetizers to program a magnet to have a specific behavior that differs from traditional magnets.  Magnets can now be programmed to have N & S poles on the same side and in different arrangements to customize behaviors.  Correlated magnets can be programmed to repel and attract at different distances from each other.   They can have small magnetic fields that don’t interact with nearby electronics or have precise alignment not offered by normal magnets.

LT Wang brought with him a of these few magnet pairs to demonstrate their unique capabilities, which I will add were very cool to play with.  He described some potential uses for these magnets.   Example 1: Reducing the risk of pinch points in different equipment such with raising and lowering of small boats on surface ships.  Example 2: Significantly reduce drilling and welding on ships by replacing nuts, bolts, and screws with correlated magnets that can keep equipment in place without even having physical contact.  Example 3: UNREP and Pulling Alongside a Pier, reducing the potential risk of hull contact on piers.
In addition to winning the ADM Simms Award, LT Wang won a gift certificate to MakerPlace so he can further develop his idea into a working prototype.

Runner-Up: “RMV Replacement” by MN2 Alexander Paramo

After seeing the challenges facing the remote minehunting vehicle (RMV), “I figured I would try to out-do Lockheed,” MN2 Paramo said during his presentation.  Using only off the shelf equipment, he figured he could create a cheap but reliable replacement.

Using a Raspberry Pi 2B for the brains and 6 bilge pumps for propulsion, he is able to create a prototype for around $370. He acknowledges that for the true military use he would have to upgrade parts but he thinks it will still cost far less than than a single RMV which runs in the millions.

We look forward to his continued development and am excited to see his working prototype in the near future.

“Start a PRODEV Circle” by CDR Emily Bassett

Mentoring in any organization or service is always a challenge.  Creating an environment where you can ask questions and have conversation without fear of reprisal or judgement is difficult to foster.  The Navy has tried to create this through multiple mentoring programs but has yet to succeed.  CDR Bassett presented a solution  that helps to solve this problem.  Called the PRODEV circle and modeled on Lean in Circles, it is a group meeting to discuss topics and continue to grow as individuals.  This group is free from the constraints of their command to provide a place to address topics with two simple ground rules, the discussion will be confidential and no advice given.  CDR Bassett has already established some groups and has been encouraged by its’ results and hopes to see it to continue to grow.  If you’d like to find out more information you can email LeanInNWC@gmail.com.

“Block-Chain authentication for publications and a common web portal” by MN1 Brian Neal

An idea near and dear to anyone who has had to develop an instruction or gone through an inspection in the Navy, MN1 Neal presented an idea to deal with the challenges of making sure you have the right instruction.

Every year numerous instructions, publications, and other written documents go through revisions.  For inspections and even day to day operations, it’s required that you use the most current instruction.  MN1 Neal’s idea is to use block-chain authentication, the same encryption method utilized by Bitcoin, to assure the user that they have the most current instruction.  Essentially every time a document is edited it will track who and when the document was edited and permanently encode it into the document.  This would allow end users to know positively that they have the current validated version of any document no matter where they got it from.  Additionally, coupling this with a central location for all publications, instructions, directives, etc would simplify the challenges to the fleet in verifying they have the right instruction all the time.

“Arctic SWARRIORs” by LT Takeru Tajiri

As a result of global climate changes, the Northern seas will become increasingly accessible to ships and submarines. At the moment, there are multiple competing claims of ownership of these waters, primarily between Canada and Russia, although others are inclined to regard the Arctic waters as “common heritage.” This has not been problematic in the past since the waters were largely inaccessible and therefore irrelevant. That will change–maybe not soon, but eventually.  If we are to maintain the status quo in these waters 10-20 years from now, we will need to be able to operate in them.

The Coast Guard routinely operates icebreakers in the Arctic waters; however, FONOPS are not the domain of the USCG. LT Tajiri proposes that we begin sending a number of committed second-tour division officers to serve on USCG ships which operate in the Arctic/Antarctic regions, so that far into the future we will have a pool of surface line officers who understand the requirements when operating at extreme latitudes (problems like gyro drift, no reliable magnetic compass, icebergs, freezing equipment, cold injuries, sensor ranges, etc). We have manuals for cold weather operations, but these are no substitute for practical experience.

Thanks again to 32 North Brewing Company for hosting another event and to Makerplace for generously donating a prize for the winner.  You can check them out here:

32 North Brewing: http://www.32northbrew.com/
MakerPlace: http://makerplace.com/
LCDR Mark Blaszczyk is the Combat Systems Training Lead in Commander Littoral Combat Ship Squadron One and the co-lead for The Athena Project’s San Diego chapter.  He is a graduate of Purdue University with a BS in Civil Engineering and Duke University with a Masters in Business Administration.

There are loads of Athena Events coming up! If you’re in the San Diego, Groton or Yokosuka areas, connect with us if you want to be a part of our upcoming events! Connect with us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/athenanavy or follow us on Twitter: @AthenaNavy. Interested in starting a movement of your own? Message us, or e-mail athenanavy@gmail.com!

Our next event:

-Monterey 1.0:  August 25th 6-9pm at London Bridge Pub.  (256 Figueroa St, Monterey, CA 93940)